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Bond Songs Ranking

Bond Songs Ranking Inhaltsverzeichnis

Ranking: Alle James-Bond-Songs inklusive Billie Eilishs „No Time To Die“. Ranking: ALLE Bond-Songs – von grauenhaft bis hammergut. Wir sagen euch, welches die besten – und die schlechtesten. Weitere nominierte Titelsongs folgten, aber erst Skyfall aus dem Jahr wurde mit dem Preis ausgezeichnet. Gesondert aufgeführt sind die Titellieder der Filme​. James-Bond: Von Hörsturz bis Ohrwurm – die Top 30 der Songs haben uns letztendlich aber für einen Platz in der Mitte des Rankings. Von Billie Eilish bis Shirley Bassey: Diese Mission hätte selbst James Bond verzweifeln lassen, doch wir haben die 24 Songs treffsicher platziert.

Bond Songs Ranking

Mein Ranking der Bond-Songs - Hier meine Rangliste der Titellieder zu den James-Bond-Filmen, vom besten bis zum schlechtesten. Es werden sicher so. Über die Jahrzehnte haben schon viele Künstler die Titelsongs der "James Bond​"-Reihe singen dürfen. Einige Bond-Songs wurden große Hits. Ranking: ALLE Bond-Songs – von grauenhaft bis hammergut. Wir sagen euch, welches die besten – und die schlechtesten.

Don't you sort of wish David Bowie had recorded a James Bond theme? I get the feeling that the Bond producers had the same dream, but they couldn't book him for the gig and instead got Here's another song in the catalog that takes all of the Bond cliches: big orchestra with swooning strings, a catchy tempo, and a big and bold vocal performance from Shirley Bassey.

This particular combo, however, is mostly unremarkable. From the most recent film in the series, the generally mediocre Spectre , Sam Smith's Oscar-winning tune is, well, just fine.

It really just sounds like a sad Sam Smith ballad. From Russia With Love is the second James Bond movie, and the first with an original song composed for the credits—although the opening credits went with a short acoustic rendition, with Matt Monro's vocal track playing over the end credits.

It's a nice song, but not a standout. Is it good? Yeah, I suppose. Years later, it feels like the song is overpowered by Adele herself, who at the time was coasting on the success of her record-breaking album Look, I get that it's fun and dancey and very Duran Duran, but I still have to say it's a missed opportunity not having A View to a Kill co-star Grace Jones singing this one.

Sheryl Crow is certainly an odd choice for a Bond song, especially since it doesn't really capture her general vibe as a solo artist the dripping strings do, however, bring to mind Bobbie Genty's "Ode to Billie Joe," a song Crow later covered.

But she nails the sultry vocals with a particularly '90s ennui. You get the sense that Crow doesn't really care either way what happens tomorrow.

Sure, it has all of the trappings of a treacly '80s love song the production is bloated with keyboards and backing vocals , but Knight still makes it sexy—and the video proves she can pull of a tux pretty well.

Jack White and Alicia Keyes's duet is the only two-hander in the film franchise, and the Quantum of Solace theme is one of the good true rock songs in the Bond catalog.

It's a great mix of White's goth-adjacent rock and Keyes's soulful voice. It works a lot better in practice than one would expect, but it's not exactly the most memorable Bond tune.

Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson has the perfect voice for a Bond song, and "The World Is Not Enough" is one of the better-case scenarios when it comes to blending the typical Bond vibe with a rock band.

It's unfortunate, however, that—much like the film it represents—it's not exactly a standout in the franchise. Tina Turner is a perfect choice for a bond theme song, and this one that accompanied Pierce Brosnan's debut as is slinky and sexy and reminiscent of Shirley Bassey's three songs.

While Turner's vocals aren't as powerful as Bassey's, her instrument blends well with the big orchestrations. And that it's both reminiscent of a classic Bond tune while also standing out as a '90s sex jam makes it the perfect combination.

There's a reason this one feels like an outlier among the other Bond tunes: While it was written by Bond composer John Barry, it wasn't used in the opening credits of On Her Majesty's Secret Service —which is often the most overlooked Bond film since it's the only one that starred actor George Lazenby.

This song feels more like a standard than any of the rest thanks to Louis Armstrong's iconic vocals. For a noisy composition, it sounds strangely relaxed, oddly calm throughout.

Cornell was a devastating vocalist with the right material, and there are moments here which allow him to open up and hint at the potential of a rock-led Bond theme.

Almost quite good. Sheryl Crow falls between these two extremes, aiming for the pout and simplicity of Nancy Sinatra, but also sticking a monster chorus into the mix as well.

And it is a good chorus, certainly: the final iteration, which arrives after a surprisingly tender and well-arranged string interlude, rescues it from mediocrity.

Adele, utterly spellbinding vocal talent that she is, basically whispers the whole song. And the subject — what is it about?

Skyfall is… a mansion in the film? Who sings a Bond song about a mansion? Or any kind of abode or dwelling? That immediate wash of strings is pure Bond atmosphere, a perfect encapsulation of the aesthetic, soundworld and grippingly cool style with which the spy was synonymous.

History-making in that, at 18, Eilish is the youngest musician to write and record a Bond theme — and she performed it at the Brit Awards with legendary composer Hans Zimmer.

As a Bond movie, Moonraker itself occupies a strange place in the canon: indebted to the lates vogue for science fiction and space movies, but still very definitely a Roger Moore vehicle for ridiculous double entendres and bonkers stunts.

As such, the title song has been somewhat brushed aside, some would argue unfairly. Confusing, but in a nice way?

What do you do after the success of Shirley Bassey's 'Goldfinger'? Get another Welsh powerhouse! While Tom Jones's effort isn't as well remembered as others, we'd argue this is an underrated song that's so much fun and couldn't be more '60s Bond if it tried.

After critics weren't too kind with Lazenby's Bond at the time, the next instalment went back to the drawing board and brought back not only Sean Connery, but Shirley Bassey too.

The theme tune was the best thing about the movie, with the lyrics written by the legendary Don Black. After the success of Duran Duran, the first Timothy Dalton movie secured the services of another huge '80s band for the theme tune.

While not quite as great as its predecessor, it was a brilliant way to usher in the new moody era of It was an offbeat choice of artist compared to what came before, but it's underrated rocker that definitely deserves more love.

This was the first time Bond went a bit melancholic with its theme tune, and it worked brilliantly. Its famous opening strings were famously later sampled by Robbie Williams on his hit 'Millennium'.

OK, this was technically not the main theme tune for George Lazenby's single outing as Bond, but it's far more memorable than its instrumental title track.

An ageing Louis was the surprise but perfect choice for this ballad, and was chosen by John Barry because he felt he could "deliver the title line with irony".

The title line is taken from Bond's final and emotional quote in the movie. One of the few Bond themes which you can actually listen to as a downright amazing pop tune before you think about at all.

The power ballad broke away from the George Martin or John Barry mould of writing Bond themes, and it was a breath of fresh air.

Extra points for always making us think of Alan Partridge with those 'clang-a-lang''s. For Pierce Brosnan's first Bond movie, they went for the tried and tested formula of landing a lendary soul icon to belt it out, and man it was amazing.

There was only one person who was going to record the theme tune for Daniel Craig's third movie in though Muse gave it a very good go too that year.

It became one of the best-selling singles of all time, won an Oscar and is basically the most successful Bond theme ever.

Joe Thornton kann nächste Saison mit Davos spielen — wenn er will. Oft gecovert und macht auch heute noch viel Laune. Die Story sollte man nicht auf den Grund hinterfragen weil der eigentliche Ablauf zwar logisch ist, aber dann im Rückblick geplant sein soll und das erscheint dann doch etwas "too much"; mit Filmfiesling Javier Bardem hat man ein herrlich fieses Scheusal und die Action ist unterhaltsam. Das Titelstück des neuen Bond-Films "Spectre" wird zwar vielerorts von den Kritikern verrissen, feiert dennoch Beste Spielothek in Prohn finden einige beachtliche Erfolge. Letzterer hätte sich auch in diesem Stück besser auf die Gitarre konzentrieren sollen, denn so wirklich will seine Stimme Crazy Vegas Casino nicht zu Alicia passen. Welches ist das beste Badi-Glace? Kunibert der Fiese Zum Glück für die Filmwelt reichte dann aber die Zeit nicht mehr, um ein neues Titelstück zu produzieren. Das neue Millennium hatte Bond auch in Sachen Soundtrack endgültig erreicht. Auf die Schnelle aus Versatzstücken zusammengebastelt von jemandem mit ADHS — so jedenfalls hört sich Casino Austria GlГјckscard Autounfall eines Songs an, mit seinen unnötig verkopften Schlagzeugbreaks.

Bond Songs Ranking Navigationsmenü

Und die baritone Kleine StraГџe Poker von Monro ist einfach purer Wahnsinn. November ausgegangen. Ooooh ja, James! Oliver Baroni. Matt Monro entführt uns auf eine Reise nach Russland, die akustisch nur wenig mit dem Land zu tun hat. Würdest du gerne watson und Journalismus unterstützen? Bond Songs Ranking

Lulu's pop stylings made her a blue-eyed soul icon, and her biggest hits are peppy and vibrant. This theme song, however, is clunky, jarring, and ultimately pretty stupid.

Maybe Madonna should have had her shot at a James Bond tune when she was an up-and-coming '80s pop star. It's Autotuned to hell, and actually has the singer inexplicably purring, "Sigmund Freud: Analyze this.

Don't you sort of wish David Bowie had recorded a James Bond theme? I get the feeling that the Bond producers had the same dream, but they couldn't book him for the gig and instead got Here's another song in the catalog that takes all of the Bond cliches: big orchestra with swooning strings, a catchy tempo, and a big and bold vocal performance from Shirley Bassey.

This particular combo, however, is mostly unremarkable. From the most recent film in the series, the generally mediocre Spectre , Sam Smith's Oscar-winning tune is, well, just fine.

It really just sounds like a sad Sam Smith ballad. From Russia With Love is the second James Bond movie, and the first with an original song composed for the credits—although the opening credits went with a short acoustic rendition, with Matt Monro's vocal track playing over the end credits.

It's a nice song, but not a standout. Is it good? Yeah, I suppose. Years later, it feels like the song is overpowered by Adele herself, who at the time was coasting on the success of her record-breaking album Look, I get that it's fun and dancey and very Duran Duran, but I still have to say it's a missed opportunity not having A View to a Kill co-star Grace Jones singing this one.

Sheryl Crow is certainly an odd choice for a Bond song, especially since it doesn't really capture her general vibe as a solo artist the dripping strings do, however, bring to mind Bobbie Genty's "Ode to Billie Joe," a song Crow later covered.

But she nails the sultry vocals with a particularly '90s ennui. You get the sense that Crow doesn't really care either way what happens tomorrow.

Sure, it has all of the trappings of a treacly '80s love song the production is bloated with keyboards and backing vocals , but Knight still makes it sexy—and the video proves she can pull of a tux pretty well.

Jack White and Alicia Keyes's duet is the only two-hander in the film franchise, and the Quantum of Solace theme is one of the good true rock songs in the Bond catalog.

It's a great mix of White's goth-adjacent rock and Keyes's soulful voice. It works a lot better in practice than one would expect, but it's not exactly the most memorable Bond tune.

Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson has the perfect voice for a Bond song, and "The World Is Not Enough" is one of the better-case scenarios when it comes to blending the typical Bond vibe with a rock band.

It's unfortunate, however, that—much like the film it represents—it's not exactly a standout in the franchise.

Tina Turner is a perfect choice for a bond theme song, and this one that accompanied Pierce Brosnan's debut as is slinky and sexy and reminiscent of Shirley Bassey's three songs.

While Turner's vocals aren't as powerful as Bassey's, her instrument blends well with the big orchestrations. And that it's both reminiscent of a classic Bond tune while also standing out as a '90s sex jam makes it the perfect combination.

There's a reason this one feels like an outlier among the other Bond tunes: While it was written by Bond composer John Barry, it wasn't used in the opening credits of On Her Majesty's Secret Service —which is often the most overlooked Bond film since it's the only one that starred actor George Lazenby.

This song feels more like a standard than any of the rest thanks to Louis Armstrong's iconic vocals. This might be a controversial placement, but I stand by it.

The theme from Octopussy —which, for understandable reasons, does not share a title with the film—is classic AM Gold and a bona fide smooth pop hit.

It might be the most anti-James Bond theme song in the entire franchise, which serves this track well. Diamonds Are Forever might be best known for being Sean Connery's final film in the Eon-produced films he'd return in 's Never Say Never Again , a sort-of remake of Thunderball , it also served as Shirley Bassey's second outing as a Bond theme song singer.

While it's better than "Moonraker" and less iconic than "Goldfinger," this one is an earworm that will likely not leave your head any time soon.

Another Bond song in the bunch that earned an Oscar nomination, Sheena Easton's contribution to the franchise remains one of the biggest hits of the Bond themes.

She's also the only singer to appear in the opening credits of a Bond film—and it's one of the few that did not incorporate John Barry's Bond instrumentals.

Those moody strings that open this tune are a perfect fit for Nancy Sinatra's brooding voice. It's a striking psychedelic number, so perfectly late '60s and darkly romantic.

This attempt by the venerable Welsh belter fits the mold of a Bond theme, with blaring horns and minor-key, lounge singer panache.

It's simply unremarkable—not terrible, not great, ultimately forgettable when compared to other songs from this early Bond era. People love this jawn, and it's a staple on easy listening radio stations.

And don't get me wrong, it's a serviceable love song. But where's the danger? The intrigue? The sex? All I can think of when I listen to "All Time High" is those erectile dysfunction commercials where two Boomers hold hands in separate outdoor bathtubs while admiring a Sonoma sunset.

It just does nothing to prep me for a secret agent movie that's about to go down. Any Bond theme that prominently features smooth saxophone over a saucy trumpet is making a choice —and it's the wrong one.

It tugs at the heartstrings, is dynamically interesting, and is elegantly produced. It's just not a Bond song! It's too happy, too sweet, too major-key.

James Bond doesn't drive across country smiling to AM radio—he's over the legal limit and being pursued by some ridiculous foe. If a Bond theme song could function as a first dance song at a wedding, it's not really a Bond theme song.

The good parts about this song? It's gauzy, a clear throwback to classic Bond ballads. Sam Smith is adequately brooding to deliver it.

It's got a not-bad chorus. The bad part? It's boring! At best, it's an ersatz "Skyfall. Shirley Bassey is the Queen of Bond theme songs, with several entries on this list.

This is the worst of those entries. Not awful, but easily the least memorable of her contributions to the Bond pantheon.

There's more rock 'n' roll swagger in this duet than the Bond franchise is accustomed. And that's okay! It's a clear example of two artists honoring the Bond motif and applying their own stylistic spin.

But it lacks the gravitas and drama of the best theme songs. It's way better as an end credits song than an opening credits song. The sensuality of Sheryl Crow's Bond theme vaults it to the middle-of-the-pack.

But Crow is an odd choice as more of a pop singer-songwriter rather than a belter or crooner and it's hard to get past that. Casino Royale is an excellent Bond film, and the first one featuring Daniel Craig.

Perhaps to announce a grittier , the late Chris Cornell was brought things into grunge things up. It's a polarizing song: extremely true to Cornell's instincts as an artist coupled with Bondian horn blasts, but maybe too Buzz Cuts for diehard Bond-lovers.

I love the ambition of asking Cornell, one of the best rock voices of his generation, to perform a Bond song, even if it didn't result in a home run.

The synthy horns definitely date "License to Kill," which sits on the slow-jammy side of the Bond theme song spectrum. As much as we think of JB as an elite assassin and secret agent, he's also a bonafide loverman!

Shirley Manson singing in a Bond movie? I'll take it. An entirely serviceable, if not world-conquering entry by the '90s rockers. Billie Eilish scares me and I think she's supposed to.

And while she's enigmatic and talented and probably going to get even bigger than she is right now, the most interesting parts of her debut album were the meshing of her voice and strange, engrossing production.

Asking her to sing a more conventional ballad over an orchestra is a treat in terms of stretching her artistic skill set.

However, it sounds more like Billie is constraining herself to Bond World than Bond World is adjusting itself to Billie, which would've probably resulted in a more memorable song.

If you weren't paying attention, you might think Frank Sinatra is crooning this classic. This lush ballad suits Sean Connery's Bond exceptionally well, and effectively transports the listener back to the original era.

Monro's voice is front-and-center, allowing it to really soar over the orchestra serving as a sonic foundation.

This song gets high placement for the simple fact that if you were to tell me, "Hey, Louis Armstrong did a Bond song," my assumption is that it would be very, very bad.

Don't get me wrong—Armstrong is a legend. But dark melodrama isn't his lane. That he doesn't lean into Bond musical tropes and still manages to turnaround a song that works within the franchise while simultaneously being enjoyable in and of itself is an achievement, and a tribute to Armstrong's enduring brilliance.

That voice! One of the most decadent Bond songs—and it's not even Bassey's best Bond song. Bow down. The build-up to the chorus makes me want to pump my fist in the air and crush some air drums.

Yes, it's not as shadowy as the rest of the Bond catalog, but who cares? Radiohead is such a slam-dunk choice for a Bond theme song that History will not look kindly on that choice, but Radiohead's exclusion makes their dejected theme that much more powerful.

Do your best not to get lost in the dour piano, the enveloping strings, and Thom Yorke's pristine falsetto. Perhaps it was too interesting to be a Bond song!

That opening string motif is just so of-the-times. Coupled with strummed acoustic guitar and an electric guitar playing that same opening string melody, Nancy Sinatra's Bond song takes you right back to the Swinging '60s.

This captures less , the action star and more , the man of mystery. Plucked harp? Sign me up. Like most of Wings' best stuff, it's essentially 3 songs in one, which helps to cover the spectrum of Bond theme moods: sentimental, frenetic, and charming.

It may be the best song on this list, but it's not the best Bond theme song because it has an entire life outside of the film.

As much as we think of JB as an elite assassin and secret agent, he's also a bonafide loverman! The power ballad broke away from the George Martin or John Barry mould of writing Bond themes, and it was a Rubbelos of fresh air. Swanky horns? There's a reason this one feels like an outlier among the other Bond tunes: While it was written by Bond composer John Barry, it wasn't used in the opening credits of On Her Majesty's Secret Service —which is often the most overlooked Bond film since it's the only one that starred actor George Lazenby. Gladys Knight — "License to Kill". It may be Mrgreen Bonuscode best song on this list, but it's not the best Bond theme Link Spiel because it has an entire life outside of the film. Billie Beste Spielothek in Steinheim finden recorded the theme Farm Heroes Spielen the 25th Bond film, No Time to Dieat just 18 years old, Wie Spielt Man Romme her the youngest artist ever to perform an original theme Beste Spielothek in Dohm-Lammersdorf finden. David Bowie. Type keyword s to search.

Bond Songs Ranking Video

Every James Bond theme song: RANKED FROM WORST TO BEST. Sam Smith dürfte es mit seinem Song zu "Spectre" schwer haben, die Top10 der besten Bond-Songs zu knacken, die Konkurrenz ist einfach zu groß. CINEMA. Mein Ranking der Bond-Songs - Hier meine Rangliste der Titellieder zu den James-Bond-Filmen, vom besten bis zum schlechtesten. Es werden sicher so. Wie sich ihr Song in die Liste der besten Bond-Songs einreiht lest ihr hier. Jack White & Alicia Keys - Another Way To Die (). Die mit. Über die Jahrzehnte haben schon viele Künstler die Titelsongs der "James Bond​"-Reihe singen dürfen. Einige Bond-Songs wurden große Hits. Ranking: Die besten und die schlechtesten James-Bond-Songs. So viel können wir verraten: Madonna liegt in dieser Liste ziemlich weit hinten.

Bond Songs Ranking - Film-Bewertung

Das ist so als würde man Gurke und Grapefruit gleichzeitig essen. Hunt , mit George Lazenby und Diana Rigg. Die nächsten Tage werden nass: Es drohen Überschwemmungen und …. Shirley Bassey: "Moonraker" - Basseys dritte und letzte Arbeit für einen Beste Spielothek in Ransberg finden ist leider die schwächste Komposition. Einfach hinten anfangen, zuhören und wenn man es bis vorne schafft, stimmt das Ranking! Etwas mit Oh-wo-eh-oh oder so? Und so was von kein Bond-Song! Das James Bond Thema ist zwar natürlich bekannt, für mich aber mehr etwas, was in der ganzen Reihe immer wieder kommt und darum nicht wirklich mit den anderen Songs vergleichbar, die sich auch meist auf Beste Spielothek in Pleinting finden einen Film beziehen. Dkb Einzahlung Saxophon ist stark! YouTube immer entsperren. Doch abseits vom Sex-Talent des Spions gibt es noch eine weitere, nicht ganz unwichtige Sache, die uns seit der Veröffentlichung des ersten Bonds im Jahr beschäftigt: die Musik! The World Is Not Enough. Rita Coolidge. Wie sich ihr Song in die Liste der besten Bond-Songs einreiht lest ihr hier. Sondern einfach nur hören, dass baby the best ist. Das Lied selbst ist uninteressant, aber eines der besseren Stücke, die Cornell ausserhalb von Soundgarden veröffentlichte.

Bond Songs Ranking - Ranking bei Spotify

Wo das Stichwort britische Crooner fällt, ist der unverwüstliche Tom Jones nicht weit. Der schwächste Bond-Song aller Zeiten wird nur schwer zu unterbieten sein. Bin sicher hier gibt es nun Kommentare mit alles unterschiedlicher Reihenfolge ;-. Zusammen mit Soundtüftler Mirwais zeichnete sie für diesen breitwandigen TechPop-Groover verantwortlich. Schlagzeug und Gitarre zu laut. Das Endresultat ist eine durchaus graziös, aber auch komplett unspektakulär dahinseiernde Kitsch-Ballade. When Bond songs are explicitly about the character of James Bond, they can tend to fall flat lyrically. It Speedybet a lot better in practice than one would expect, but it's not exactly the most memorable Bond tune. That wah-wah secret agent guitar? After a somewhat strange choice the previous year in Rita Coolidge, they stepped it up a notch for Roger Moore's Beste Spielothek in Sommerkeller finden movie, by hiring the biggest band on the planet. It's got all the moody strings and all, but 373 Vorwahl doesn't really go anywhere.